A Canterbury Tale: Gerald Bray on Gafcon II and the future of the Anglican Communion | Anglican Ink 2014 (c)

 

One of the biggest fallacies in talking about missions is the assumption that the sending church, the oft-unspoken assumption, will always be in charge, and the receiving people will always have a dependent, needy church.  It is not hard to see the prejudice in that statement and we are quick to reject any idea that we think we are better than them.

Yet, even as parents and children have a hard time negotiating the teen years, and the changes from childhood to adulthood, so the Global Church continues to struggle with the “teen years” of our one Church.  GAFCON II evidences that struggle on both sides of the equation.

The Rev. Bray calls on the African Church to reach out with greater courage to other parts of the Church (e.g. to resist the temptation to go it on their own), and at the same time calls on Canterbury and the Western Church to take note of the significant accomplishments of the African Church in particular and the Global South in general.

The goal of missions is to raise up brothers and sisters in Christ Jesus, so that together we can kneel at the foot of the Cross and stand at the throne of God as one family in Christ.  We, as a Church, must learn how to work together across the Globe, and truly become “one holy catholic and apostolic Church”.

A Canterbury Tale: Gerald Bray on Gafcon II and the future of the Anglican Communion | Anglican Ink 2014 (c).

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